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Cataract Refractive Surgery Information

Cataract Refractive Surgery
Pre-operative Evaluation
Desired Refractive Result
Implant Considerations
Day of Surgery
Risks of Cataract Surgery
Cataract Testimonials
IOL Counselor Web Tool
Cataract References
Modern Cataract Surgery Video


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Refractive Cataract Surgery at Tri-County Eye

Background

Drs Richard Tax, Richard Prince, and Jeff GordonCataract surgery, the most commonly performed out-patient surgical procedure in the United States, provides patients with an improved level of visual acuity thereby enhancing one’s quality of life. Research studies have shown that this surgery and its resultant improvement in visual acuity can enhance one’s activities of daily living and functioning making it safer to ambulate, especially for the elderly. At the very least, cataract surgery not only has the potential to improve one’s visual acuity but now, with optional, advanced premium multi-focal, astigmatic and mono-vision lens implants, permits better unaided vision for both distance and near resulting in more independence from eyeglasses.

Definition

Dense CataractThe crystalline lens of the eye is primarily responsible for focusing incoming rays of light onto the retina, the tissue in the back of the eye that is analogous to the film in a camera. A cataract is a medical condition in which the crystalline lens of the eye is no longer clear but cloudy. The lens can become yellow, dense white, brownish or even covered with a coating much like frosted glass --- all resulting in the lens’ inability to focus light clearly on the retina. This results in blurred vision for distance or near and sometimes both; it also manifests as increased glare with lights (such as on coming car headlights) and difficulty in reading small printed material. Causes of cataract first and foremost include aging. However, medications such as high dose and prolonged use of oral steroids may lead to premature cataract formation. Additionally, cataracts may be caused by direct trauma to the eye, diabetes, metabolic disorders and even congenital conditions present at birth.

Most people will develop cataracts to some degree as they age. However, not all people will develop a visually significant cataract, in other words a cataract that decreases visual acuity and interferes with activities of daily living. Fortunately, when one does indeed develop a cataract that is visually significant, the out-patient surgical treatment is relatively minor, safe, painless and highly successful in the absence of any other co-existing ocular disorders (such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, retinal disorders and optic nerve problems).

Diagnosis

PSC cataractSymptoms of cataracts are usually first noticed by the patient (with symptoms of blurred vision) and then diagnosed by an eye healthcare professional such as an optometrist or ophthalmologist. A comprehensive, dilated eye examination will usually reveal the cataract to be the cause of the decreased visual acuity. Other ocular disorders and diseases must be ruled out to determine the potential for improving one’s vision with cataract surgery alone. In patients whose only ocular problem is a visually significant cataract and in the absence of any other eye conditions, the prognosis for improving the vision with cataract surgery is usually excellent. Even in patients with other co-existing ocular conditions such as glaucoma, mild, dry macular degeneration or even amblyopia (lazy eye), cataract surgery may be able to provide some level of vision improvement. An informed decision is made by the patient, along with guidance from his eye doctor and family, if and when to proceed with this elective, out-patient surgery.

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Cataract Refractive Surgery Information

Cataract Refractive Surgery
Pre-operative Evaluation
Desired Refractive Result
Implant Considerations
Day of Surgery
Risks of Cataract Surgery
Cataract Testimonials
IOL Counselor Web Tool
Cataract References
Modern Cataract Surgery Video